Supporting disabled members, celebrating achievements

21 Nov 2018

Disability History Month runs from 22 November to 22 December.  This year’s theme is disability and music.

UK Disability History Month (UKDHM) is an annual event designed to focus on the history of struggle for equality and human rights for disabled people. It began in the UK in 2010.

This year’s theme is disability and music.  The organisers of UKDHM believe that looking at the range of great disabled musicians can work to remove some of the prejudices towards disabled people as well as highlighting the beneficial effects of music.

Despite this, music lessons are being squeezed out of the school curriculum: in 2012/13, 84% of 13/14 year olds had music lessons, but by 2018 this was down to 47.5% (The Guardian 10 October 2018)

Key Statistics

  • Full-time disabled workers earn on average 12.6% (£75 a week) than full-time non-disabled people
  • There are 4.2million disabled people living in poverty which is 29% of all people living with a disability
  • There are more disabled women than men in the UK (23% compared to 19%)
  • Every day in the UK, 250 people start to lose their sight.
  • The number of people living with sight loss will increase to more than 2.7 million in 2030 and 4 million in 2050
  • By 2030, there are expected to be 2 million more adults with mental health problems than in 2013
  • 50% of mental health problems are established by age 14 and 75% by age 24
  • Disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed than non-disabled people
  • By the age of 26, disabled people are four times more likely to be out of work or not in education compared to non-disabled people
  • 1 in 5 employers say they would be less likely to employ a disabled person
  • Two thirds of single disabled people living alone are in poverty

Get involved

For more information, please visit the equality pages on the website and email equality@pcs.org.uk with details of any events you are holding in your workplace.

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